Priscilla Watts Cemetery memorial chapel

Man creates artwork from fieldstone

John Anderson dearly loved rocks, judging by his lifetime of work with them. It wouldn’t be surprising if his mother had to empty his childhood pants pockets of stones before she washed his clothes, nor is it surprising he chose a career in stone masonry.

But the true test of his partiality exists yet today in the creative and beautiful work he performed with rocks – mere fieldstones – erecting exquisite functional edifices, making Rugby – and all of North Dakota – the richer for it.
 

Lineworker Training Center

Cooperatives climb to the top

From Pearl Street to the Pierson farm. From New York to near York.

On Sept. 4, 1882, Pearl Street station, Thomas Edison’s complete direct-current electric system, was publicly unveiled in Lower Manhattan. Edison’s electric idea eventually reached North Dakota farm country, where the Ray and Evangeline Pierson farm, 3.5 miles south of York, was energized by Baker Electric Cooperative on Thanksgiving Day 1937. It was the state’s first farm to receive electricity.

Pam Emmil

5 Second Rule Bracelet leads creator to sobriety

5-4-3-2-1. Pam Emmil didn’t count on a pain medication prescription plummeting her into addiction. But those five numbers helped count her steps back to sobriety. And to a thriving, therapeutic business.

Wrapped around Emmil’s wrists are the bracelets that not only helped her overcome her addiction, but which are now part of her business, 5 Second Rule Bracelet.

She now shares her personal journey of opioid addiction – and recovery – through her business, as she sells bracelets and other jewelry with a message.

Titan machinery Raven OmniDrive autonomous grain cart

Big Iron Farm Show unveils newest innovations

Visitors to the 42nd annual Big Iron Farm Show presented by the Cass County Farm Bureau will immerse themselves in three days of hands-on agricultural advancements. The three-day celebration of agriculture includes informational exhibit booths, innovative field demonstrations and opportunities to see the latest in agriculture unveiled. And admission and parking are free!

Mike Schlosser, Jay Mathern, Tim Moch, Grant Mathern and Garitt Irey

Butcher’s Edge: Edgeley ranchers build small-town beef processing plant

In an industry dominated by giants, Butcher’s Edge, a new beef processing plant located at the south edge of Edgeley, may seem like a small player.

Even so, Butcher’s Edge will play a big role boosting the local economy by offering ranchers a place to process their beef, providing employment for at least six local workers and offering customers a reliable source for some of the most wholesome beef raised in the United States.

Robert “Bob” Hunter, Maddock’s oldest resident, holds his U.S. Army portrait, taken over 75 years ago during his World War II service. Photos by NDAREC/Liza Kessel

Thank you, Bob. A WWII Reflection, 75 Years Later.

At 100 years old, Hunter still lives in the home he built decades ago, kitty-corner from the old Maddock Aggies school, now the high school. An American flag flies in his yard, near the parked car he still drives. Inside his home, the TV news hums in the background of his Solitaire game, which he does to “stay sharp.” A hallway bookshelf holds the Bible, Lutheran hymnals, Maddock history compilations and Webster’s New Students Dictionary. Adorning every possible space are pictures of his successful and well-educated family.